10th ALDinHE Conference 2013: Celebrating Learning Development
Plymouth University 25th – 27th March 2013
Plymouth logo

Poster Presentation

The posters and the LearnHigher, ALDinHE and publishers’ stands will be in the Crosspoint area throughout the conference, close to the registration desk and refreshment area. Poster presenters will be available for questions and discussion over lunchtime on Tuesday March 26. On Wednesday lunchtime from 12.45 - 13.30 we have arranged for delegates to ‘Meet the presenters: chat over lunch’. This is a further opportunity for delegates to chat to presenters running workshops that they weren’t able to attend.

Click on each poster title to view details, or just scroll down the page to browse

  1. Exploring the benefits of Peer to Peer helping Relationships. Anne Bentley, Plymouth University
  2. Web Analytics for strategic development of learning resources. Caroline Cash, Falmouth University
  3. PALS in Psychology: What works? Catherine Deeprose, Jaysan Charlesford, Becky Choma, Phil Gee, Plymouth University
  4. How harmful is paraphrasing? Chris Doye, University of Edinburgh, Bob Keim, retired, University of Kent
  5. Seeing is Believing. Claudette Davis-Bonnick, London College of Fashion University of the Arts London
  6. Mapping Translation Strategies in Academic Writing. Courtney Hopf, Dr. Christina Delistathi, Brunel University
  7. Developing Reflective Practice: Trainee teachers in primary and secondary settings. Debbie Holley and Alison Feist, Anglia Ruskin University
  8. Making Facebook work for you! Flea Palmer, Plymouth University
  9. Student Journeys. Helen Capstick, Southampton Solent University
  10. Academic Skills and Employability. Julia Braham, University of Leeds
  11. Dyslexia and reading for a degree. Kassandra Clements, Plymouth University
  12. Transforming Learning Using Open Educational Resources. Kate Littlemore, University of Northampton
  13. Developing distance learners' digital literacy at the Open University. Katharine Reedy, Open University
  14. Intercultural Ambassadors Programme. Katy Manns, Julia Braham, University of Leeds
  15. 'What did I do wrong?': Investigating student understanding of referencing. Kim Shahabudin, University of Reading
  16. STARS – A differentiated development pilot scheme. Mary Dickinson, Alistair Morley and Alice Wilkinson, University of Surrey
  17. Building a Service Model Using the Scholarship of Learning. Maryann Kope, University of Guelph, Canada
  18. Approaches to Languages Development. Sam Bamkin, De Montfort University
  19. The 24/7 Study Advice workshop: Developing bite-size study resources using screencasting. Sonia Hood, Michelle Reid, Kim Shahabudin, Judy Turner, University of Reading
  20. Learning Development and Dyslexia: A Developing Approach. Tracey Slawson, De Montfort university


1 - Exploring the benefits of Peer to Peer helping Relationships - Anne Bentley, Plymouth University

This poster will illustrate the rationale and proposed development of a Peer Support Programme in Plymouth University. It offers an opportunity to assess.

  • The academic and personal benefits on Peer Supporters of participation
  • The development of transferable social and employment skills in Peer Supporters
  • The benefits of a supportive resource for students who may not normally access more formal support such as the Student Counselling Service

The key output of the project will be the development of Good Practice Guidelines for the potential wider implementation of a Peer Support Programme across Plymouth University.

Click to view full-size poster

2 - Web Analytics for strategic development of learning resources - Caroline Cash, Falmouth University

This poster will illustrate the rationale and development of an introductory open education resource (OER) on web analytics. It offers a CPD opportunity to learning developers who are involved in designing online learning resources and who have to report on the impact of these resources to key stakeholders.
Web analytics and web metrics allow the learning developer to:

  • Track broad categories of users
  • Identify and strategically develop international outreach
  • Appropriately nuance resources to audience
  • Evidence engagement with resources
  • Inform the development of future resources

The key output of the Falmouth project is a step-by-step tutorial that guides the user on how to gather and interpret Google analytics data to inform international perspectives and development of open education projects.
http://openspace.falmouth.ac.uk/courses/website-analytics-open-education-projects

Poster 2

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3 - PALS in Psychology: What works? - Catherine Deeprose, Jaysan Charlesford, Becky Choma, Phil Gee, Plymouth University

Peer Assisted Learning is the in the second year of operation in the School of Psychology at Plymouth University. Stage 4 leaders facilitate fortnightly sessions with Stage 2 students. Leaders have been trained in a number of activities designed to facilitate enhanced learning and understanding, and adapt these techniques as they see best for each session. The content of each session is agreed between students and leaders, and materials are based around existing lecture notes, hand outs and recommended reading.

Our current research explores the specific content of each session, and the activities which are rated by leaders to have worked well and those which have not. In identifying the content and activities which are considered effective, we hope to inform the development of PALS. We are also gathering data on the PALS experience for leaders, and how this may influence their own professional and educational development. We will present our findings from these on-going evaluation processes, and present discussion on how these findings may be utilised to drive forward future success for PALS in Psychology.

poster-3

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4 - How harmful is paraphrasing? - Chris Doye, University of Edinburgh, Bob Keim, retired, University of Kent

Why is using sources appropriately in writing so problematic for so many students? This poster lays the blame in significant part on our frequent injunction to students to "put it in your own words". It suggests that telling students to paraphrase is counterproductive and helps foster the attitude that 'referencing' is a random set of irrational rules. So what alternatives can we offer? And can we get academics on side?

Poster 4

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5 - Seeing is Believing - Claudette Davis-Bonnick, London College of Fashion University of the Arts London

In a week long workshop visual impaired volunteers with little or no sewing experience were able to design a garment, draped it on the stand, made patterns and produced the garment.

This amazing project took an insightful approach to supporting the visually impaired in developing their creativity and has been instrumental in enabling understanding of how impaired students can be supported at the London College of Fashion.

Amongst my discoveries were their skills in computers, sensitivity with tacit skills and a gift for problem solving. Equipment and materials used were found to benefit all learners and tutors on various courses.

poster 5

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6 - Mapping Translation Strategies in Academic Writing -
Courtney Hopf, Dr. Christina Delistathi, Brunel University

Academic writing can be challenging for many international students, leading them to resort to translating from their first language to complete a task. This often leads to substandard academic writing. This study hypothesizes that it may be possible to improve performance by using translation skills to expand students’ repertoire of writing strategies. Through translation activities and interviews with first-year international students, this study maps student translation strategies and relates them to the practice of professional translators. Ultimately, the results will inform the teaching of learning developers and better target the needs of non-native speakers of English.

poster 6

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7 - Developing Reflective Practice: Trainee teachers in primary and secondary settings - Debbie Holley and Alison Feist, Anglia Ruskin University

Our project aimed at offering opportunities to gain an insight into the process of learning, both for trainees as teachers and for those that they will teach. Central to this is the importance of gaining an understanding of the learning process, particularly in relation to their own subject knowledge, awareness of the school context and the changing requirements of being a teacher. Prior to the start of the course successful applicants are asked to complete subject knowledge audits and personalised post-interview targets, and the website provides further information and resources. Our website is designed to engage potential trainee teachers with the reflective practice skills they will need to become successful qualified teachers.

poster 7a poster 7b

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Click to view poster 2

8 - Making Facebook work for you! - Flea Palmer, Plymouth University

Facebook is a popular social networking platform used by many students. While it is great for sharing news, photos and videos with friends, it can also be detrimental to employability prospects as profiles are frequently checked.

However, you can use Facebook to your advantage. This poster illustrates how this can be done through

  • managing your privacy settings
  • organising friends into lists so that you can target who sees what content
  • creating groups for working collaboratively
  • using your Public Profile as an online CV/ portfolio
  • adding a ‘subscribe’ button so that non-friends can view your public posts on their newsfeeds

Poster to follow

9 - Student Journeys - Helen Capstick, Southampton Solent University

After a successful bid for funding from ALDinHE, the learning skills team at Southampton Solent University have produced five, three minute films of students who use the service frequently. Envisaged as a ‘student journey’, the films were created to not only enrich existing learning resources but also to attract students, international students in particular, to make use of the learning skills services.

The ‘talking heads’ style of filming charts the student’s early motivation for their degree course and their academic experiences through to the support provided by both the succeed@solent study skills website and the learning skills tutors, and will enhance the recently upgraded succeed@solent website.

Poster 9

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10 - Academic Skills and Employability - Julia Braham, University of Leeds

This poster introduces a new resource designed to support student employability.

Leeds for Life at the University of Leeds encourages students to recognise the skills and attributes gained through their academic curricular and to evidence how these skills enhance their employability. Programmes of study are expected to provide opportunities to develop attributes that will make the graduating student employable, and module catalogues identify which skills students will develop by studying these modules.

Students however struggle to describe how experiences and skills gained through the curriculum translate to professional practice, and to relate the language of job adverts which ask ‘ do you love it when you create something from scratch and your plan comes together?’ to an academic discourse which refers to the ability to ‘ analyse information, synthesise views, make connections and, where appropriate, propose creative solutions’.

To bridge this gap, we have created a new online Employability resource which sits alongside the students’ academic skills pages. This interactive resource supports personal tutorials and helps students recognise and assess their employability skills, draw up action plans, and translate their university experiences to make a successful transition from academia into the world of work.

Poster 10

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11 - Dyslexia and reading for a degree - Kassandra Clements, Plymouth University

Academic reading skills are instrumental to academic success (Hermida, 2009). Resources for academic reading skills development are still largely text-based, which can cause accessibility problems for dyslexic students (Eckert, 2004).

The poster will communicate the key finding, rationale and methods of the first phase of our ‘Dyslexia and Reading for a Degree’ research. This 10 months Plymouth-based MA dissertation project is conducted in partnership with dyslexic students via focus groups and through students’ active engagement in all processes of the study (Seale 2011).

The poster will highlight the main barriers participants’ experience in accessing academic reading development. We will theorise on alternative interpretations for dyslexic student’s difficulties with text-based instruction and put forward some possible solutions.

Poster 11

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12 - Transforming Learning Using Open Educational Resources - Kate Littlemore, University of Northampton

The Centre of Achievement and Performance (CfAP) at the University of Northampton delivers a pre-enrolment module entitled “Study Skills for Academic Success”. In early 2013 the course team embarked upon an intensive 2-day workshop to re-design the course for online delivery (and create OERs). We worked closely with the University’s Professor of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education and a team of Learning Technologists to achieve this aim. The course will be piloted in April 2013 and rolled out from September 2013. This poster will disseminate our work more widely and hopefully encourage comment and suggestions from the learning development community which may help us develop our work.

Poster 12

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13 - Developing distance learners' digital literacy at the Open University - Katharine Reedy, Open University

This poster provides a summary of how the Open University is approaching digital and information literacy. It highlights what we understand by digital literacy and why it is important. It presents in visual form the OU’s digital and information literacy framework, the approach we are using to integrate the skills into the curriculum and the materials we are developing to support this. It complements the parallel session on ‘Developing distance learners’ digital literacy at the Open University.

Poster 13

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14 - Intercultural Ambassadors Programme - Katy Manns, Julia Braham, University of Leeds

This poster will outline Intercultural Ambassadors programme at Leeds which aimes to increase :-

  • students’ cultural awareness, cross-cultural skills and employability
  • the amount and quality of interaction between UK and International students from different cultural backgrounds
  • the quantity, range and uptake of intercultural activities on campus

The poster is used to visually depicts the Intercultural ambassadors programme which created a framework for University and Students’ Union staff and students to work in partnership on intercultural learning and skills development activity.

The programme is designed to attracts a very diverse group of students, in terms of cultural background, discipline and study level which inturn offers rich opportunities for participants to learn from each other and to extend the reach of the programme to an equally diverse peer group.

Poster 14

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15 - 'What did I do wrong?': Investigating student understanding of referencing - Kim Shahabudin, University of Reading

Plagiarism continues to be a live issue in UK institutions, with significant consequences for both students and institutions. For the student, penalties range from resubmission of work, through a zero mark, all the way to dismissal. For the institutions, consequences can also be serious with complaints against universities in England and Wales increasing by 20% in 2012, with disputes over plagiarism accusations driving the increase (The Office of the Independent Adjudicator, 2012). Despite the availability of a wide range of advice (internal and external) on effective practices for independent learning, students continue to report that they do not have a clear understanding of when and how to use citations, or how to avoid unintentional plagiarism.

This poster will communicate work-in-progress on a research project carried out at the University of Reading into effective strategies for teaching referencing practices. It will include research into how problems arise with tutors and students; summaries of best practice resources; and suggested strategies to motivate and engage students with the task of understanding referencing practices at university.

Poster 15

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16 - STARS – A differentiated development pilot scheme - Mary Dickinson, Alistair Morley and Alice Wilkinson, University of Surrey

This pilot project is looking at ways in which ‘high achieving’ students can be more effectively targeted and supported by a central learning development team. In trying to address the decline in ‘good degrees’ between level 4 (year 1) results and final degree classifications, we worked initially with students attaining 70% at level 4 and developed, in collaboration with the students, a programme designed to address particular needs they had.

The poster will cover

  • What is STARS
  • Who took part
  • Aims, objectives and results
  • Institutional perspectives
  • Would it work elsewhere
  • The ethics and ‘fairness’ of such an approach
  • Suggestions for future practice

Poster 16

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17 - Building a Service Model Using the Scholarship of Learning - Maryann Kope, University of Guelph, Canada

Assessment, research-based practice, and professional development are key concerns for learning support professionals. Learning Services at the University of Guelph in Canada has developed a model of service delivery based on the interaction of these three areas, utilizing the Scholarship of Learning as a framework.

Objectives: Participants will

  • discover connections between research-based practice, assessment, professional development and the Scholarship of Learning
  • understand how the Scholarship of Learning can be adapted and extended to serve as a service model framework.

Poster 17

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18 - Approaches to Languages Development - Sam Bamkin, De Montfort University

This poster reflects on the design of workshops and tutorials, drawing on two years’ experience working with on non-traditional home students, as well as international students, to develop language.

It outlines and provides examples and reflection on three approaches to language development. These reflect differing learning needs and practical outcomes, but also question simplistic definitions of language and learning, seeing language as a process to construct rather than a target set of knowledge.

Poster to follow

19 - The 24/7 Study Advice workshop Developing bite-size study resources using screencasting - Sonia Hood, Michelle Reid, Kim Shahabudin, Judy Turner, University of Reading

In response to student demand for study resources that are multi-modal, accessible on a range of devices, and can be worked through at the students’ own pace and in their own time, the Study Advice team at the University of Reading are in the process of developing bite-size animated resources (on the topics of essay writing and referencing) using screencasting and presentation software.

This poster charts our resource development journey: looking at our rationale and choice of technology; what we learned from the development process and tips on efficient screencasting; and our current plans for using the screencasts to trial a ‘flipped learning’ model for generic workshops.

Our collaborative development journey has enabled us to be more efficient when creating future resources and would be of interest to anyone considering producing similar online study resources.

Poster 19

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20 - Learning Development and Dyslexia: A Developing Approach - Tracey Slawson, De Montfort university

We initially undertook the request to provide some ‘tailored’ dyslexia workshops (for students already, or in the process of being, diagnosed) with some trepidation, but we have learnt a lot. From the development of this request, and the insight the experience has offered, a number of projects and ideas have begun to grow.

This poster details that original project, ‘Bridging the Gap’, and shows how our ideas and projects have begun to grow beyond it. The poster also asks the observer about their knowledge, projects and ideas. Are you working on, or do you know of, similar dyslexia or SpLD projects?

Poster 20

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